Taking the Moral High Ground in the Internment of 2020

Taking the Moral High Ground in the Internment of 2020

Who is it that really cares about lives?

Jack Kerwick

Life in the Age of the Great UnReason can be difficult for some of us.

Conservatives and others who now take exception to the Internment of 2020—the reduction of citizens’ homes, towns, and states to what amounts to internment camps from which they are forbidden to leave via “Shelter-in-Place” orders—typically frame their position in terms of “reopening the economy.”   

In doing so, they stack the deck against themselves.

Putting the matter this way cedes the moral high ground to those who want to prolong the Internment, for it invites the latter to depict the conflict as one between those, like themselves, who care about life, versus those conservatives who only care about “money.” 

Indeed, this is exactly what has happened.  

Those of us who have recognized the Great Unreason for what it is from the outset and who demand a restoration of America would be well-served to take a different tack. It is we, and not those who insist upon suppressing the country, who have the moral capital:

Tens of millions of people forced out of work;

Over 100,000 businesses forced to close forever, and thousands upon thousands more that have been made to lose millions;

The inevitable increase of instances of suicide and domestic abuse (here and here);

The exacerbation of such mental health phenomena as despondency, depression, and anxiety;

The higher incidences of alcohol and drug abuse (here and here) that invariably correlate with unemployment and alienation;

The loneliness and accompanying depression of untold numbers of elderly and sick people whose families have been forbidden by state governors from visiting them in hospitals and nursing facilities;

The loneliness and accompanying depression of untold numbers of people from all backgrounds who have been alienated from their friends, families, faith communities, and the myriad of other associations to which they’ve belonged and that define their identities as the specific, unique individuals that they are;

The people who have grown sicker, and who have outright died, because they have been denied medical attention that has been reserved for COVID-19 patients (here, here, and here);

The exponential exacerbation of tensions between the citizenry, particularly those citizens who otherwise have been their biggest defenders, and police officers who attempt to enforce the oppressive decrees of governors;

The de facto indefinite revocation of the United States Constitution (as New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy now infamously, and ominously, told Tucker Carlson when the latter challenged his authority to, in effect, intern the residents of his state: “The Bill of Rights is above my paygrade.”);   

The promotion—via those “Social Distancing” protocols proscribing human contact and requiring the wearing of those stupid, hideous masks—of something bordering on a paralyzing fear of others;

The unprecedented closing of churches and other houses of worship;

The starving of hundreds of millions and potentially billions (see here)of otherwise impoverished peoples from around the planet whose lives will be made that much more wretched by the disruption of the global food supply chains within which America is the most indispensable of links;

And, let us not forget—what the media seems all too ready to forget—the tens of thousands of elderly, immunocompromised nursing facility patients to die from The Virus because governors like Andrew Cuomo in New York and Phil Murphy in New Jersey forced these facilities to accept COVID patients.

These are the consequences that have ensued from the “mitigation” policies—based as they are on the wildly inaccurate models designed by the now disgraced, epically and perpetually wrong Neil Ferguson—prescribed by such bureaucrats as Anthony Fauci and Deborah Birx, enthusiastically promoted by partisan hacks in Big Media, and imposed upon the citizenry by power-hungry politicians.

This is the incalculable human suffering and death brought about by those who coerced the country into “Social Distancing.”  

Physically; emotionally; psychologically; spiritually; socially—the real crisis, the real existential crisis, confronting all of us is not some virus from which 99.6%-99.9% of those who contract it recover, but the reduction of America to a giant internment camp and its citizens to its prisoners.

It is the mandatory “quarantining,” or “lockdown,” of America that comprises the greatest of all “public health” crises.

Governors, like (#not) my governor, Phil Murphy of New Jersey, style themselves war-time executives.  They incessantly appropriate the rhetoric of war to justify their draconian decrees.  Yet wars have and can only ever be waged against people, not viruses.  It is the residents of their states upon whom they are waging “war”—even if many of the residents are ignorant of the fact that they are the targets of a (sweeping, remarkably successful) psychological operation and the governors justify their actions in the name of “keeping people safe.”

Given the foregoing facts, it is high-time for the opponents of the Internment to take the moral high ground that is rightfully theirs.  I recommend (for now) taking at least the following two steps going forward:

(1) First, while “lockdown” is certainly a term loaded with negative connotations, we may be better advised to select the term used here, for “internment” dredges up in the collective consciousness the memory of a darker time in our history when Americans of certain backgrounds were confined to geographical regions of the country that were made into “camps.”  This is a set of circumstances that most Americans have been determined to never again replicate.  In referring to our present situation as an “internment,” perhaps more people will catch onto its ominous character.

(2) Those in conservative media, especially those on television, like, say, Fox News, should stop with the running numbers of (alleged) COVID-19 infections and deaths and, instead, focus exclusively upon the immeasurable suffering and death brought about by the Internment of 2020.  They could spend countless hours reporting on personal stories from around the country of people who have been adversely impacted by it.

Those of us who detest the Internment have all of the moral capital. 

Our oppressors who have interned the country, imperiling not just hundreds of millions of Americans, but potentially billions of human beings around the planet, have none of it. 

Let’s start acting like the moral superiors on this issue that we are.

Let’s put the Great UnReason behind us once and for all.

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